Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on FacebookShare on Google+
image

Ogechika Alozie, MD, MPH is CMIO at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in El Paso, TX.

Tell me about yourself and your work.

I’m chief medical informatics officer at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in El Paso. That’s a mouthful. We became an independent campus last year. We were part of the Texas Tech system, which includes Lubbock, El Paso, Amarillo, Odessa, and Dallas. We’re a separate entity legally. We’re doing a lot of separation things that happen when two organizations have been together for tens of years.

The biggest thing of interest for our environment is that El Paso is about 70 to 80 percent Hispanic and we’re also on the border. It creates some unique challenges in terms of language, socioeconomics, a lot of things that big cities have anyway, but they don’t have them in the magnitude that we probably have them. We’re a new medical school as well, so that creates some of unique challenges of financing. We’re just moving forward with the challenges of healthcare, academic healthcare, and academic education that a lot of other people are dealing with at the same time.

You’re probably the only informatics person I know whose background is infectious disease with an ID fellowship. Does that impact how you think about informatics?

I hope it that it changes it a little bit. I hope I think of things in a more of a public health manner.

How I got into ID and then informatics … I was born in Nigeria, but grew up in the Twin Cities. I went back to Nigeria to go to medical school. I did a lot of public health work while I was post-medical school in Nigeria. I realized that I had no idea what I was doing in terms of the skills of basic statistics and epidemiology. I came back to Minnesota, got my MPH from there, and then did residency and fellowship.

It was during residency that my mentor, Kevin Larsen, who’s at the ONC now … we started flipping to Epic. We were one of the first hospitals in the Twin Cities to go to Epic. That whole process of EMR and notes and things being digitized for me just seemed really cool. I hated writing, so for me, it was very selfish in that it was just easy.

I’ve taken that going forward as I think about things like HIV and hepatitis C, which are my clinical specialties. I hope that I think about things at a more population level. Instead of thinking about it as one patient at a time, every encounter is important. When I talk to our president and CFO and CIO, I try to look at, how is this …read more

Source:: http://histalk2.com/2015/03/09/histalk-interviews-ogechika-alozie-md-cmio-ttu-health-sciences-center-el-paso/

      

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on FacebookShare on Google+