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Sutter Health’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) recently announced an employee accessing patient files without a business or treatment purpose. Here are the details from their press release:

California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) recently notified 844 patients of its discovery that a pharmacist employee may have accessed their records without a business or treatment purpose.

CPMC first learned of the incident through a proactive audit of its electronic medical record system on October 10, 2014. The initial audit resulted in identification and notification of 14 individuals on October 21, 2014. Following its policy, CPMC terminated its relationship with the employee and broadened the investigation

The expanded investigation identified a total of 844 patients whose records the employee may have accessed without an apparent business or treatment purpose. It is unclear whether all of these records were accessed inappropriately but, out of an abundance of caution, CPMC notified all of these patients.

This was a fascinating breach of HIPAA. In fact, it starts with the question of whether we should call this a breach. In the HIPAA sense, it’s a breach of HIPAA. In the IT systems security sense, I could see how people wouldn’t consider it a breach since the person didn’t visit anything he wasn’t authorized by the IT system to see. Semantics aside, this is a HIPAA issue and is likely happening in pretty much every organization in the US.

My last statement is particularly true in larger organizations. The shear number of staff means that it’s very likely that some users of your IT systems are looking at patient records that don’t have a specific “business or treatment purpose.” I’m sure some will use this as a call for a return to paper. As if this stuff didn’t happen in the paper world as well. It happened in the paper world, but we just had no way to track it. With technology we can now track every record everyone touches. That’s why we’re seeing more issues like the one reported above. In the paper world we’d have just been ignorant to it.

With this in mind, I start to wonder if we won’t see some HIPAA audits for organizations that haven’t reported any violations like the ones above. Basically, the auditors would assume that if you hadn’t reported anything, then you’re probably not proactively auditing this yourself and so they’re going to come in and do it for you. Plus, if you’re not doing this, then you’re likely not doing a whole slew of other HIPAA requirements. On the other hand, if your security policies and procedures are good enough to proactively catch something like this, then you’re probably above average in other areas of HIPAA privacy and security. Sounds reasonable to me. We’ll see if it plays out that way.

The other lesson we need to take from the above HIPAA breach notification is that we shouldn’t be so quick to judge …read more

Source:: http://www.emrandhipaa.com/emr-and-hipaa/2015/02/05/will-hospitals-be-at-risk-for-hipaa-audits-if-they-dont-have-hipaa-violations/

      

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