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The HealthBox-Bangladesh program is being designed to equip Informal Health Providers (IHPs), such as village doctors and community health workers, with enga… Video Rating: 5 / 5

The first question many doctors ask when new patients call for appointments is how they intend to pay. If the answer is Medicaid, the doctor can expect to lose money. The Texas Legislature has been balancing the state’s budget by intentionally paying doctors 40 to 75 percent less for Medicaid patients than what private insurers pay for the same treatment (4/27).

In the emerging consumer-centered, value-driven U.S. healthcare marketplace, the EHR vendors that survive and thrive will need to differentiate their brand by successfully competing on the value (quality/price) their product actually delivers to its end users. – Bob Coi, MD This is a fascinating look at EMRs and future differentiation in the EHR market. There’s little doubt we could use some EMR differentiation with so many EMR companies still out there. I’m just not sure that the quality of care that an EMR provides is going to be why a doctor selects one EMR over another EMR. Every doctor I know wants to provide great care to their patients. Every patient I know wants to go to the doctor who provides them the best care. The problem is that most doctors don’t see a direct correlation between EMR use and the quality of care given. Patients don’t either, and the other challenge is that patients have no way to measure the quality of care they’re given anyway. The closest we come to knowing if the doctor provided quality care is that as a patient I know I’m sick and then I get better. I guess if I got better, then the doctor must have provided me quality care. With this said, I think there’s the possibility that an EMR discovers a way to clearly show that something they do improves the care of the patient. The incremental document management and simple alert notifications that we see from EMR’s today won’t show that clear improvement in care. No, we have to think much bigger to clearly show that the care provided was better because of the EMR and that the improved care wouldn’t have been possible without the EMR. An example of this would be integrating genomic data into the care provided. What if genomic data influenced which drugs you prescribed so that the drug was perfectly tailored to the patient? This is a great example where it would literally improve the care you provide a patient and it would be impossible without the technology to do the analysis. Assuming this technology was integrated with the EMR, it would be impossible for doctors not to use the EMR. This is just one example. I’m sure creative entrepreneurs will come up with many more. Showing that EMR improves quality of care is a really high barrier. Plus, changing physicians perceptions on EMR is going to be really hard even if an EMR system does indeed improve the quality of care. Some company will do it and then Dr. Coi will be right that an EMR’s quality metrics will differentiate it from other EMR companies. Related posts: EMR Quality Metrics New Ways Of Leveraging EMRs For Quality Measurement EMR Vanity Metrics

The following is a guest post by Daniel Goldberg, CEO of Gold Medical Marketing By now, most physicians have at least begun the process of cleansing their offices of bulky patient charts and opted for the less cumbersome EHR / EMR systems.  Regardless of the system you are using, EMR data may hold a value that is far less obvious than just convenience. EMR contains a wealth of demographic information about patient bases

Surfing the Web in his all-white Dumbo loft, Dr. Jay Parkinson, 37, looks like any other young tech visionary. He has a trim beard and thick-framed glasses. He wears slim-fitting black outfits and jaunty scarves. He speaks with a measured, “This American Life”-like cadence. And he’s a firm believer in the utopian promise of the […]

Cervical cancer and human papilloma virus (HPV) affect thousands of women each year. Regular screening tests like pap tests and pelvic exams can help find cancer and other health problems early and improve recovery and survival rates. Talk to your doctor about scheduling your next test! Find out more about Medicare’s pap test and pelvic exam coverage . For more information about HPV, check out the American Cancer Society’s HPV Frequently Asked Questions . To learn more about Cervical Cancer, go to the American Cancer Society’s Web site for Cervical Cancer Information . Filed under: Uncategorized

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