Earlier this year NueMD created a nice looking Meaningful Use Infographic — asking the question whether MU was helping or hurting EHR Adoption. I loved the summary but I wanted to dig in a little further so I asked Dr. William Rusnak, a resident physician in radiology and a healthcare IT writer for NueMD, to tell us what that infographic meant for innovators and folks building solutions. Here’s what Dr. Rusnak said:

When the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) launched their Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Programs, coined “Meaningful Use” (MU) back in January 2011, the main goal was to reward healthcare practitioners and administrators for adopting EHRs and increasing efficiency within their practice. NueMD, a medical billing software company, decided to take a closer look at the effectiveness of this program. They compiled research from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), CMS, and the American College of Physicians (ACP) looking to identify adoption trends and determine potential obstacles to successful implementation.

The results are quite interesting and have shed some light upon the massive opportunity for technical breakthroughs in healthcare. If tech innovators want to join the movement, they should be continually searching for processes in medicine that still involve some sort of manual transmission of information. Talk to your friends that are nurses, doctors, office managers, billers, or administrators. You would be surprised simply by the amount of information still being written on papers and stuffed in pockets throughout the day!

Adoption, attestation, and a younger generation of physicians

According to a survey of more than 1,200 physicians, EHR adoption is certainly taking place, but when it comes to officially attesting to Meaningful Use – the numbers suggest there’s still room for improvement. Practices with more than 50 physicians had the highest rate of EHR adoption at 85%, with 62% attesting to MU. The big disparity exists among small practices (less than 10 providers) in which half have implemented EHR technology, while only 25% have attested to MU.

This will improve, though. With younger physicians beginning to practice and take on leadership positions, it is very likely that adoption rates will increase substantially over the next decade. In the past, one of the biggest challenges EHR vendors have faced is working with a userbase that wasn’t keen on technology. Soon, however, the majority of practicing physicians will be of the generation that was introduced to technology much earlier in life. Additionally, Medical Economics states that even many older physicians have become comfortable in using technology in their practices, claiming that this age-group has begun to see some of the highest rates of EHR adoption. Thus, the market, not only only for EHR, but also nearly any kind of health technology, is just about ready to surge.

User satisfaction and efficiency, or lack thereof

Although this data suggests EHR adoption is on the rise, providers’ feelings about implementing and using EHRs is showing another trend.  Between March 2010 and December 2012, user satisfaction decreased …read more