1-20-2014 8-28-26 AM

Adam Cheriff, MD, is chief medical information officer of

Tell me about yourself and the organization.

I am the chief medical information officer for Weill Cornell Physicians. I’m a part-time internist, the rest of the time responsible for the clinical health information technology and clinical operations for our physician organization. Weill Cornell Physicians is 950 multi-specialty faculty physicians associated with New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

You recently went live with Epic. How’s that going and what are the most important lessons that you’ve learned so far?

We have been an Epic ambulatory customer for many, many years, since 2001. We have a great deal of experience with ambulatory clinicals. What we did most recently was convert our legacy practice management system, which had been GE-IDX, to Epic. We’re very happy with how that’s gone.

We gave it a lot of careful consideration as to what the motivations were for doing it. For us, it was really about trying to consolidate onto a single platform for our administrative and clinical systems; the patient experience and improving it via self service; and lowering the training burden for our staff and faculty. We had an eye towards the future, where we knew we were going to have to do more advanced analytics, and being able to seamlessly move between the clinical and the administrative was a big deal. We had a hope that in doing this that we would lower some of our long-term operating costs.

We went into it with what we thought was good justification. I thought we were thoughtful in terms of how we restructured organizationally from an administrative business unit standpoint in order to support the implementation. That really was a lot of matrixing of the IT and clinical staff that knew the Epic clinicals and knew how to manage that relationship, the business office that were the core revenue cycle domain experts, and our finance office. I think that matrixing really helped a great deal.

Some organizations, particularly on the hospital side, have struggled with the conversion to Epic from a revenue cycle standpoint. What’s been your impact?

We feel very fortunate, obviously. I think the press seems to have a little bit of a selection bias in terms of seizing on, unfortunately, the missteps. I can completely see how these things would happen. They’re extremely complicated projects.

We have felt very, very fortunate about how things have gone. I should say that our implementation methodology may have predicted some of our success. Despite the fact that Epic would like to see organizations do this big bang — and I think that there are reasons for that in terms of not necessarily bleeding this out and being trapped in two worlds — we did this in a series of …read more