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Tag archives for the-current

Criticism of the current lack of focus on interoperability of electronic health record systmes in the Meaningful Use program is “misguided,” according to Judy Murphy, deputy national coordinator for programs and policy at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, who spoke last week at a symposium in Philadelphia. read more

The Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank which proposes policy reform legislation, has released a proposal that would lower healthcare costs and ultimately, reduce the federal deficit by $560 billion. The proposal includes a Medicare system that would allow beneficiaries to choose from three coverage options including the current fee-for-service model, a Medicare Advantage plan, or enroll in new ‘Medicare Networks’ within traditional Medicare. The Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank which proposes policy reform legislation, has released a proposal that would lower healthcare costs and ultimately, reduce the federal deficit by $560 billion. The proposal includes a Medicare system that would allow beneficiaries to choose from three coverage options including the current fee-for-service model, a Medicare Advantage plan, or enroll in new ‘Medicare Networks’ within traditional Medicare. read more

While some providers, no doubt, are frustrated with the current state of electronic health records, optimism lies ahead, according to James Cimino, M.D., chief of Laboratory for Informatics Development at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. read more

Claims that the current physician resource shortage is due to the reduced work effort of physicians are misleading and ignore important trends, namely the demographic changes within the profession, the growth in non-physician spending that has outpaced spending on physicians and the relative decline in spending on physician services over the past 20 years. Such data make it difficult to support Evans’s and McGrail’s (2008) assertions, which distract from more fruitful policy discussions about eliminating the current shortage of physicians, integrating non-physician health providers into medical practice and otherwise meeting the growing demand for health services.

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